SailAweigh

Geeky lady of a certain age, I have my cats for company and fannish friends in the magic box. I dabble in strange corners of the internet, offering ideas and images both silly and profound. I love the ocean, green and growing things, laughter, social justice and comics, to name a few. Follow at your own risk.
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Posts tagged "life"
It’s messing people up, this social pressure to “find your passion” and “know what it is you want to do”. It’s perfectly fine to just live your moments fully, and marvel as many small and large passions, many small and large purposes enter and leave your life. For many people there is no realization, no bliss to follow, no discovery of your life’s purpose. This isn’t sad, it’s just the way things are. Stop trying to find the forest and just enjoy the trees.

Sally Coulter  (via tv-in-black-n-white)

Yeah. You don’t have to have an extraordinary life. (Note to self: Read previous sentence.)

(via arliss)

carlosbaila:

Marina Abramovic meets Ulay

“Marina Abramovic and Ulay started an intense love story in the 70s, performing art out of the van they lived in. When they felt the relationship had run its course, they decided to walk the Great Wall of China, each from one end, meeting for one last big hug in the middle and never seeing each other again. at her 2010 MoMa retrospective Marina performed ‘The Artist Is Present’ as part of the show, a minute of silence with each stranger who sat in front of her. Ulay arrived without her knowing it and this is what happened.”

“En los años 70, Marina Abramovic mantuvo una intensa historia de amor con Ulay. Pasaron 5 años viviendo en una furgoneta realizando toda clase de performances. En 1988, cuando su relación ya no daba para más, decidieron recorrer la Gran Muralla China, empezando cada uno de un lado, para encontrarse en el medio, abrazarse y no volver a verse nunca más. En 2010 el MoMa de Nueva York dedicó una retrospectiva a su obra. Dentro de la misma, Marina compartía un minuto en silencio con cada extraño que se sentaba frente a ella. Ulay llegó sin que ella lo supiera, y esto fue lo que pasó”

(via lunarflares)

jonnovstheinternet:

Life within death.

Physalis alkekengi, or the Chinese/Japanese Lantern, blooms during Winter and dries during Spring. Once it is dried, the bright red fruit is seen. The outer cover is a thin mesh that held the flower petals, seen in golden brown colour.

(via lunarflares)

astolat:

wow, this is utterly brilliant and also terrifyingly plausible! (seen at laurashapiro@LJ)

(via devildoll)

Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.
Anne Lamott (via day-party)

(via dduane)

lochnessmoron:

bill—maplewood:

Cedric Laquieze is an artist working out of Amsterdam. I like the idea that Cedric has taken the idea of taxidermy art, and added a different twist to it. The idea of skeleton is a clear link to death, but with the flowers adorning them the idea seems to be softened. It’s also a stronger connection to life; if we did not go through such trouble to embalm and preserve, the bodies we bury would give way to other life such as flowers. (Via)

(via fyrdrakken)

The sail, the play of its pulse so like our own lives: so thin and yet so full of life, so noiseless when it labors hardest, so noisy and impatient when least effective.
Henry David Thoreau (via phano42)